Luxury in Cartagena

Colombia’s most famous writer, the inimitable Gabriel García Márquez, once said in a press interview that he could never have written his books if he had not been a journalist – because all of his material was extracted from reality. Wandering between the pastel-coloured colonial structures of Cartagena’s labyrinthine cobbled streets, one could be forgiven for thinking that they had…

Read more

Beaucoup Baku

Baku has a medieval Islamic core surrounded by lavish late 19th and early 20th-century European styles and modern skyscrapers and designs. Layers of history can be unraveled by exploring the architecture in Baku as you pass through Azerbaijan’s different eras. Read more courtesy of TheCultureTrip.com  

Modest mosque

Centrally located in the Iranian capital Tehran, the Vali-e-Asr Mosque’s most distinguishing aspect is the fact that it does not look like a mosque. Designed by Iranian architects Reza Daneshmir and Catherine Spiridonoff of Fluid Motion Architects, the building eschews the stereotypical typology of large domes and tall minarets in favour of a modest horizontality thereby making the mosque harmoniously…

мекица!!

I studied abroad in Greece my first semester of college. It was not my first trip to Europe, but the semester was my first time in Greece or Eastern Europe. Studying in Thessaloniki, Greece, I was just under a four drive from the capital of Bulgaria, so I needed to take a trip to try Bulgarian food. Read more courtesy…

Brasilia!

Few places in the world offer such an expansive, extraordinary composition of Modernist architecture as the Brazilian capital. Part of a handful of Modernist clusters around the world – such as, for example, Le Corbusier’s Chandigarh in India – Brasilia combines the gravitas, drama and scale of the International Style with the glamour and power of a country’s beating heart,…

A first for Asia!

Southeast Asia is one of the most magical regions on earth. Filled with stunning beaches, historic temples, verdant jungles and bustling cities, there’s something for every traveler there. But staying healthy and safe is something to consider when visiting a region so different from your own, especially for the first time. Things like visa requirements, best times to visit, currency…

Vegetarian-friendly ‘Burial of the Sardine’

Fishy stuff is going on around Spain tonight. Black-clad processions and gigantic papier mâché sea creatures on wheels, huge bonfires, public feasts, live music, fireworks and, in some cases, partying until dawn. We know about eating fish on Good Friday, but the pre-Lent carnivals and, in the Anglo-Saxon world, the Shrove Tuesday pancake feast, was only last week. And in any…

Weed love to see you, bud

Thailand is in a good position to tap the green rush and forge a path in medical marijuana tourism. Its neighbors are keenly watching its developments, even as the region’s pace toward marijuana legalization is still slow. Read more courtesy of skift.com 

Ye olde Japan

While the 2020 Summer Olympics bring a brand new stadium and state-of-the-art facilities to host city Tokyo, don’t get it twisted: things in Japan are old – really, really old. As an elementary school history class might’ve taught you, Christopher Columbus sailed to what would later be known as North America in 1492, a cool 528 years ago. On the other side of the globe, Japan’s ancient…

Gawk like an Egyptian

The ancient Egyptian burial site of Saqqara has been studied for more than a century, due to the importance of the location for political, religious and architectural history. One of the country’s most popular tourist destinations, it is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. But a new “born-digital” publication by UC Santa Cruz associate history professor Elaine Sullivan takes a…

Indian food you’ve never heard of

At Café Lota, Head Chef Udit Maheshwari is on a mission to introduce diners to regional Indian cuisine they may have never sampled before. The outdoor café at the National Crafts Museum in New Delhi specializes in lesser-known dishes, like chingri kamranga khatta (prawn curry with star fruit), a guava vegetable dish, and a curry with roasted papadum. With the…

Rain forest jazz

Lush, unspoiled St. Lucia has a growing fan base. Some of its vacationers are music lovers, letting loose at the springtime St. Lucia Jazz & Arts Festival, or adrenaline junkies, testing their limits climbing The Pitons or zip lining through the Chassin region’s rain forest. Others are honeymooners, unwinding on one of the island’s chalky beaches or holing up in one of…

Goa a-go-go

I stood at the epicenter of India’s only Latin Quarter, Fontainhas in Goa, surrounded by a palette of purple, orange, red and blue painted houses topped with ornamental roosters and terracotta tiles. Boarded windows painted with Christian art were garnished with petals and pots of tulips, a shrine to the quarter’s Catholic roots. Past the traditional Portuguese taverns and the…

A church open for only one day a year

In the Greek town of Eleusis, ancient and modern celebrations find common ground at the Church of Panagia Mesosporitissa. The church is only open once a year, on the eve of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, when people gather to celebrate mass and partake in a tradition that once honored Demeter, the Greek goddess of agriculture. Read more courtesy…

Egyptian queens

When it comes to women’s rights, ancient Egypt was ahead of its time. Gender did play a role in Egyptian society—men, for example, commonly occupied positions of authority, while women were relegated to household duties—but women were seen as the equals of men in most other aspects of life. Ancient Egypt’s women owned property, participated in the legal system, and…

The art of coffee

Famous Saudi coffee roasters Elixir Bunn opened their new location in Riyadh, designed by Azaz Architects. After building a strong reputation for their coffee, it was time to build an atmosphere to complement their famous drinks. Coffee in Saudi Arabia is well-rooted into the local culture and could be traced back to times prior to the formation of the Kingdom. Read…

El modo de boda

In the spirit of this being the most popular season to tie the knot (in the northern hemisphere, at least), I wanted to share with you some of the most unique features of weddings in Spain… from a Brit’s point of view, at least. Having lived in Spain for approaching 10 years and having attended my fair share of summer…

Sub-Lima-aahh

Renowned chef Gastón Acurio opened his first restaurant in his hometown of Lima in 1994. Since then, the Peruvian capital has blossomed into one of the world’s most fascinating gastro-powerhouses. Native, Spanish, Chinese and Japanese techniques and traditions mix in the melting pot city. Andean staples such as quinoa, amaranth and a myriad of potato and tuber varieties combine with…

Ecotourism and the Amazon rainforest

By creating employment opportunities, boosting sales of local produce and discouraging deforestation, ecotourism could be a vital barrier against the destruction of natural sites like the Amazon. Read more courtesy of BusinessDestinations.com  

Algeria awaits you

On paper, Algeria has it all: postcard-perfect Mediterranean beaches along 1600km of coastline, evocative ruins of the ancient Roman empire, neverending Saharan desert dunes and labyrinthine medinas to rival those of neighbouring Morocco and Tunisia. But the reality is that it’s one of the most challenging countries to visit in the Middle East and North Africa: getting an Algerian visa…

Translate »