Chiloé to go!

Chile is famous for its varied landscapes, from the cracked, dry sands of the Atacama Desert to the snow-capped peaks and turquoise lakes of Patagonia. But it’s off the lanky country’s southern coast (and just a short two-hour flight from Santiago) that you’ll find a true secret respite, charmingly quaint and ripe for exploration by intrepid travelers: Chiloé Island. The largest…

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Jungle bubbles

In Chiang Rai, Anantara Golden Triangle Elephant Camp & Resort gives guests the chance to camp alongside elephants in transparent bubble suites.  Dah and her friend, Pum Pui, are not morning elephants. As the sun rises over my transparent, domed sleeping quarters mere feet away, the gentle giants are slow and still. Mae Noi, on the other hand, is having…

This is not the end

Apocalyptic comfort from ancient Iran. At its height, around 620 CE, the Sasanian empire ruled over a territory stretching from Jerusalem in the west to Samarkand in the east. The royal court at the ancient city of Ctesiphon, near present-day Baghdad, was the political heart of this vast realm, and its official religion was the ancient Iranian faith, Zoroastrianism. In…

Uzbekistan’s gems

Uzbekistan is renowned as one of Central Asia’s most culturally rich destinations, with ancient cities, spellbinding architecture and a compelling history. Created by travel photographer Christopher Wilton-Steer, a new project on the Silk Road has been announced that includes documentation of the striking beauty of the nation’s palaces and mosques. Read more courtesy of LonelyPlanet.com   Booking.com

The first global city

In 1678, a Chaldean priest from Baghdad reached the Imperial Villa of Potosí, the world’s richest silver-mining camp and at the time the world’s highest city at more than 4,000 metres (13,100 feet) above sea level. A regional capital in the heart of the Bolivian Andes, Potosí remains – more than three and a half centuries later – a mining…

Babylon systems

This Babylonian Map of the World is a clay tablet containing a labeled depiction of the known world, with a partially surviving description, dated to roughly the 6th century B.C. The map is circular with two outer defined circles. The plan is centered on the Euphrates, flowing from the north to the south of the map. The city of Babylon…

Masada

There’s nothing quite like stepping out onto the summit of Masada, the sun beating down on you and the Dead Sea stretching out before you. This stunning ancient fortress is one of the most visited sites in Israel for a reason, and everyone should aim to visit at least once if planning a visit to the country. Read more courtesy…

Luxury in Cartagena

Colombia’s most famous writer, the inimitable Gabriel García Márquez, once said in a press interview that he could never have written his books if he had not been a journalist – because all of his material was extracted from reality. Wandering between the pastel-coloured colonial structures of Cartagena’s labyrinthine cobbled streets, one could be forgiven for thinking that they had…

Beaucoup Baku

Baku has a medieval Islamic core surrounded by lavish late 19th and early 20th-century European styles and modern skyscrapers and designs. Layers of history can be unraveled by exploring the architecture in Baku as you pass through Azerbaijan’s different eras. Read more courtesy of TheCultureTrip.com   Please rotate on mobile devices

Modest mosque

Centrally located in the Iranian capital Tehran, the Vali-e-Asr Mosque’s most distinguishing aspect is the fact that it does not look like a mosque. Designed by Iranian architects Reza Daneshmir and Catherine Spiridonoff of Fluid Motion Architects, the building eschews the stereotypical typology of large domes and tall minarets in favour of a modest horizontality thereby making the mosque harmoniously…

мекица!!

I studied abroad in Greece my first semester of college. It was not my first trip to Europe, but the semester was my first time in Greece or Eastern Europe. Studying in Thessaloniki, Greece, I was just under a four drive from the capital of Bulgaria, so I needed to take a trip to try Bulgarian food. Read more courtesy…

Brasilia!

Few places in the world offer such an expansive, extraordinary composition of Modernist architecture as the Brazilian capital. Part of a handful of Modernist clusters around the world – such as, for example, Le Corbusier’s Chandigarh in India – Brasilia combines the gravitas, drama and scale of the International Style with the glamour and power of a country’s beating heart,…

A first for Asia!

Southeast Asia is one of the most magical regions on earth. Filled with stunning beaches, historic temples, verdant jungles and bustling cities, there’s something for every traveler there. But staying healthy and safe is something to consider when visiting a region so different from your own, especially for the first time. Things like visa requirements, best times to visit, currency…

Ye olde Japan

While the 2020 Summer Olympics bring a brand new stadium and state-of-the-art facilities to host city Tokyo, don’t get it twisted: things in Japan are old – really, really old. As an elementary school history class might’ve taught you, Christopher Columbus sailed to what would later be known as North America in 1492, a cool 528 years ago. On the other side of the globe, Japan’s ancient…

Gawk like an Egyptian

The ancient Egyptian burial site of Saqqara has been studied for more than a century, due to the importance of the location for political, religious and architectural history. One of the country’s most popular tourist destinations, it is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. But a new “born-digital” publication by UC Santa Cruz associate history professor Elaine Sullivan takes a…

Indian food you’ve never heard of

At Café Lota, Head Chef Udit Maheshwari is on a mission to introduce diners to regional Indian cuisine they may have never sampled before. The outdoor café at the National Crafts Museum in New Delhi specializes in lesser-known dishes, like chingri kamranga khatta (prawn curry with star fruit), a guava vegetable dish, and a curry with roasted papadum. With the…

Rain forest jazz

Lush, unspoiled St. Lucia has a growing fan base. Some of its vacationers are music lovers, letting loose at the springtime St. Lucia Jazz & Arts Festival, or adrenaline junkies, testing their limits climbing The Pitons or zip lining through the Chassin region’s rain forest. Others are honeymooners, unwinding on one of the island’s chalky beaches or holing up in one of…

Goa a-go-go

I stood at the epicenter of India’s only Latin Quarter, Fontainhas in Goa, surrounded by a palette of purple, orange, red and blue painted houses topped with ornamental roosters and terracotta tiles. Boarded windows painted with Christian art were garnished with petals and pots of tulips, a shrine to the quarter’s Catholic roots. Past the traditional Portuguese taverns and the…

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