Never forget

On 10 June 1944, the village of Oradour-sur-Glane in Haute-Vienne in Nazi-occupied France was destroyed when 642 of its inhabitants, including non-combatant women and children, were massacred by a German Waffen-SS company. A new village was built nearby after the war, but President Charles de Gaulle ordered the original maintained as a permanent memorial and museum. Read more courtesy of Wikipedia.org

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Paper trails

Ted Florence is ready for his family trip to Botswana. He has looked up his hotel on Google Maps and downloaded a digital map of the country to his phone. He has also packed a large paper map. “I travel all over the world,” says Florence, the president of the international board of the International Map Industry Association and Avenza…

Have a nice trip

A psychedelic experience can be deeply rewarding, but also carries real risks. Here’s how to avoid a bad trip. Humans have consumed substances with consciousness-altering properties for millennia. Traditional societies used them in healing rituals, initiation ceremonies and to make contact with the gods and the dead, among other practices. Today they are known as psychedelics, and include the naturally…

Is this the real life?

Is this just fantasy? Philosophers and physicists say we might be living in a computer simulation, but how can we tell? And does it matter? Our species is not going to last forever. One way or another, humanity will vanish from the Universe, but before it does, it might summon together sufficient computing power to emulate human experience, in all…

This may float your boat

One of the best ways to beat the heat in the summer is heading to the water—whether that means an ocean, lake, river, or canal. But why rent a house near the water when you can actually stay on the water? There are all sorts of floating accommodations across the United States. Some are permanently docked in marina neighborhoods, like those in…

Superlative things were done

In 1978, the science-fiction author Michael Moorcock wrote the celebrated essay ‘Epic Pooh’ that lambasted J R R Tolkien and his ilk for constructing fantasy universes in which – whatever the ‘there and back again’ meanderings of the plot – nothing ever really changes. Moorcock felt that his own ‘new worlds’ science fiction of the 1960s was a radical intervention…

Fabbriche di Careggine rises again

In the mountains of Central Italy, there’s a medieval village that’s been at the bottom of a lake since the 1940s. And next year, it seems like it’s finally going to come back to the light. The village of Fabbriche di Careggine dates back to the 13th century and used to be inhabited by ironworkers. It became a “ghost village”…

Babylon systems

This Babylonian Map of the World is a clay tablet containing a labeled depiction of the known world, with a partially surviving description, dated to roughly the 6th century B.C. The map is circular with two outer defined circles. The plan is centered on the Euphrates, flowing from the north to the south of the map. The city of Babylon…

Masada

There’s nothing quite like stepping out onto the summit of Masada, the sun beating down on you and the Dead Sea stretching out before you. This stunning ancient fortress is one of the most visited sites in Israel for a reason, and everyone should aim to visit at least once if planning a visit to the country. Read more courtesy…

1400’s flatpack house

This timber house built in the 1400s was dismantled and kept in a Buckinghamshire barn – a medieval flat-pack home that’s for sale at £100,000… Mention a ‘flat-pack’ home for sale and you might imagine a latest offering from Ikea, or perhaps something destined for the centre of Tokyo. You’re less likely to imagine a 15th-century former merchant’s house, painstakingly…

Hiding giants

Danish artist Thomas Dambo creates larger than life sculptures hidden around his hometown of Copenhagen. His sculptures require secret poems and clues in order to locate them. He says each has its own treasure map or poem engraved into stone to steer people onto unfamiliar paths where they’ll discover them. Read more courtesy of CanYouActually.com   Klook.com

You’ll never talk alone

Now, this is good news! With a large touchscreen, noise-cancelling microphones and a text-to-translate camera, Pocketalk is able to create connections across 74 different languages. The sleek design is equipped with high-quality, noise-cancelling microphones and two powerful speakers so it’s easy to have full conversations, even in noisy environments. The camera instantly recognizes and translates text, the written word, and…

Ancient Rome for all ages

Do you devour every documentary on the ancient world you can find? Or are you simply fascinated by the Ancient Romans and ready to learn more? This is the best way to begin! One of the most rewarding aspects of learning about Ancient Rome is recognizing the immense influence it has on our daily lives. Here’s your chance to hear…

How many pictures can YOU take?

Over the past few years, Google, Microsoft and even Apple have bene pushing cloud storage as a safe and secure method to store our data online while also allowing for quick and simple file sharing.  Google Drive has been one of the leaders in the space for quite some time, offering free storage tiers to anyone who has a Google/Gmail…

1000 year-old flour

ith stay-at-home orders in effect across the United Kingdom, bulk buyers and consumers alike have been purchasing much more flour than normal, according to the National Association of British & Irish Millers (NABIM). To help meet this spike in demand, a 1,000-year-old English flour mill has resumed commercial production for the first time in decades, reports Jason Lewis for the Bournemouth Daily Echo.   Booking.com

Hang out in Japanese neighbourhoods

Did you know that Japan’s shrines and temples welcome regular tourists to stay for a night or more? Experience authentic Zen meditation, the traditional, vegetarian cuisine called shojin ryori, and explore a fascinating world so different from anything you know. Staying at a shrine or temple is an experience that even a lot of Japanese people don’t get to have that easily, a unique glimpse into the realm…

You can be Hadrian, virtually

This long distance footpath is unique because it follows a World Heritage Site. Hadrian built the Wall to separate the Roman Empire from the barbarians. It is a complex structure with curtain wall, milecastles, turrets, ditches and forts. Walking the Path is logistically easier if the east-west route is followed. The Path that mainly follows the Wall has cityscape, farmland,…

Remember earth?

Remember Google Earth? Many years ago, it was on everyone’s lips.  Oooh and ahhhh. But then it all seemed to go quiet. Perhaps it’s time for another look.  Not only is it dazzling technology, but it can also be very useful in your holiday planning. See more courtesy of GoogleEarth.com   Booking.com

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