From Zanzibar to Berkeley Square

Good news for world travelers! British Airways’ customers will be able to fly to more destinations across Africa, thanks to a new codeshare agreement with Kenya Airways. Customers flying to Nairobi with British Airways will be able to seamlessly connect onto 20 destinations across East and Central Africa, including Douala, Zanzibar, Lusaka, Mombasa, Addis Ababa and Entebbe, as well as offering customers…

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The world-first Antarctic Climate Expedition

Here’s a chance of a lifetime, in many aspects.  How often do we commoners get a chance to mix with scientists, artists, musicians, education and economics luminaries, and work on something so important as climate change. Aurora Expeditions is thrilled to announce a world-first Antarctic Climate Expedition in 2023 with ‘Hero of the Planet’ Dr. Sylvia Earle. Read more here courtesy…

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Volando sobre las vegas

Volando sobre las vegas (flying over Las Vegas) We would expect that many of our readers have been to Las Vegas, and maybe more than once.  You  might think that you’ve seen pretty much everything there. Well, here’s a smooth video that might just prove you wrong.  Unless, of course, you’re able to fly with the birdies.  If that’s the…

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How now, brown cow?

If you visit our site, you will know how much we like and promote India.  It is a massive, crowded, bewildering, lovely and intoxicating place.  The people are uniformly kind and helpful and funny.  The sites are breathtaking.  The cities are a swirl of activity.   If you haven’t been, please do so.  And, know that cows are indeed sacred in…

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Let’s eat here

After the world has been decimated by Covid-19, now that the fog is clearing somewhat, it’s time to focus our thoughts on those businesses and their employees who have been so profoundly impacted.  In other words, when you can, buy local. Eating locally produced food on your travels may seem like small potatoes, but the benefits are far-reaching. Read more…

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Red sky at night, traveler’s delight

China is set to enter the space tourism business. This should come as no surprise to anyone who is awake in this day and age.  We wonder why we haven’t seen this kind of offering sooner than this:  the Chinese know how to get things moving. ANU astrophysicist and cosmologist Dr Brad Tucker says it is “not surprising” China is…

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I don’t care

Everyone wants their chance to fly, but no-one wants to die doing it. Both United and American Airlines sell basic economy tickets which are non-changeable. If you get sick and do not fly you lose all value of your ticket. That’s a huge incentive to fly sick. (Delta makes basic economy tickets changeable through December 31, 2021.)   As of this…

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Wonky

For hundreds of years, London has always had – more or less – the same skyline: only one or two skyscrapers.  The rest of the city stayed low to the ground. This was not a mistake.  The main reason that the height of building were restrained was because St Paul’s Cathedral had to be easily visible from all around the…

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Play us a sea shanty

If you like to cruise, you’ve probably been on a few over the years.  Cruise lines are always refreshing their fleets, or looking for new thrills – such as roller coasters – while you’re aboard. However, some lines opt for a more refined approach to being on-board.  One of which – Fred. Olsen lines (and an affiliate of ours) go…

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An old book smells like ancient Egypt

A book has got smell. A new book smells great. An old book smells even better. An old book smells like ancient Egypt.  Ray Bradbury But a new Egypt is even better, and it is getting better every day, indeed, especially when it comes to new architecture. Contemporary Egyptian architecture draws from a rich history. As a cradle of civilization,…

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Why do we sleep?

‘That we come to this earth to live is untrue. We come but to sleep, to dream.’ – Aztec poem Humans have long wondered why we sleep. A well-rested prehistoric mind probably pondered the question, long before Galileo thought to predict the period of the pendulum or to understand how fast objects fall. Why must we put ourselves into this…

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We’ll leave the light on

When the Romans built things, they built them to last.  Just take a look at Rome itself, with the Parthenon and its companion buildings. But here is another rather spectacular example of the Romans building things to last. The Tower of Hercules is an ancient Roman lighthouse on a peninsula about 2.4 kilometres (1.5 mi) from the centre of A…

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Art of glass

Seems like the real thing. If you find yourself in San Francisco airport, skip the Dunkin Donuts and feast on something truly delectable – the Lipofsky glass exhibit. Marvin Lipofsky (1938–2016) was a founding member of the American studio glass movement. Throughout his career, Lipofsky explored the limits of form and color in glass and helped to elevate the medium…

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It all comes out in the washi

Every summer, giant warriors roam the Japanese city of Aomori. Lit from within by lanterns, these formidable paper floats are the centerpiece of the Nebuta Matsuri, a weeklong evening festival in August and one of Japan’s biggest seasonal events. Accompanied by taiko drummers and dancers, the floats depict scenes from kabuki and Japanese mythology. Each takes months to design and…

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(Not the Republic of) Dominica

Have you heard of Dominica?  Officially the Commonwealth of Dominica, is an island country in the Caribbean. The capital, Roseau, is located on the western side of the island. It is geographically situated as part of the Windward Islands chain in the Lesser Antilles archipelago in the Caribbean Sea. The island is located near Guadeloupe to the northwest and Martinique…

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It’s a string thing

Peruvians from the Huinchiri community in Cusco region are rebuilding a 500-year-old Incan hanging bridge, made using traditional weaving techniques to string a crossing together spanning the Apurimac river far below. The Q’eswachaka bridge has been used for over 500 years to connect communities divided by the river. But during the Covid pandemic it fell into disrepair and collapsed in…

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